Abstracts

Lisa Biber-Freudenberger

Bio

Foto_Biber-FreudenbergerDr Lisa Biber-Freudenberger is Senior Researcher at the Center for Development Research at Bonn University. She is working on crosscutting issues of nature conservation and human development holds a doctorate in Biodiversity Research from Potsdam University. She also has a master degree in International Nature Conservation and a Bachelor Degree in Biology. She has been working in different projects including bioeconomy (www.strive-bioecon.de), climate change and land use, ecological impacts of roads, integrated pest management and organic farming. As a member of science-policy-interfaces and with a strong background in interdisciplinary as well as transdisciplinary research she has been involved in different policy-relevant scientific activities such as the the TEEB Germany initiative or the Eklipse Expert Working Group on Biodiversity and Businesses.

Abstract

Recent strategies that have promised providing economic growth and well-being to a growing number of people in the developing countries has been to focus on innovative business ideas that utilize renewable resources, provide inclusive economic growth and have the idea of sustainable development at their heart. As a consequence, a movement has formed around the concept of green and social entrepreneurship, anchored in the principles of green and biodiversity-friendly economies. These ‘social enviropreneurs` seek to provide solutions for environmental and social problems acting as societal agents of change while exploring and promoting innovative development pathways. Different often ecological and social business ideas have evolved in areas such as the cascading use of biomass, waste treatment, efficient and biodiversity friendly food production systems, ecotourism and others. These business models usually claim to be more sustainable socially and ecologically than traditional ones. However, in many cases business ideas that initially seemed to provide sustainability advantages, have turned out to have drawbacks that were not thought of before or that were ignored on purpose to “green-wash” conventional enterprises. For the purpose of this workshop, we identify two conditions for a business idea to fall under the category of social enviropreneurship: 1) the business idea has to be truly sustainable not only in an economic but also from a social and environmental perspective and 2) the innovative idea behind the business needs to have a market or be able to create a market on its own in order to be replicated by others. But while markets require processes of commodification and exchange, with attendant economic valuation, e.g. natural capital, social enviropreneurships need to be attentive also to non-monetary valuations of nature. Furthermore, the need for due diligence in the initial phase of a green business and the monitoring of its impacts on biodiversity and social developments are two important aspects that need to be integrated in business models and to be considered by all relevant parties.

Download Teaser Presentation of Forest Session here.


Jan Janosch Förster

Bio
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Dr. Jan Janosch Förster is a senior researcher at the Centre for Development Research in Bonn, Germany. Having lived, worked and studied in South Africa for more than four years, Janosch’s research interests are natural resource governance, sustainability governance, socio-ecologicalsystems,bioeconomy and circular economy concepts. As a political scientist by training from Berlin, Janosch holds a Masters in Integrated Water Managementand a PhD with a specialisation on water governance in South Africa.

Abstract
Download Teaser Presentation of the Water Session here


Andrew Venter

Bio

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Inspired and shaped by the anti-apartheid struggle of the 1980’s and the dawn of the “new” South Africa in the 1990’s. A self-defined social and environmental justice activist. PhD from the University of Natal (now KwaZulu-Natal), through which a community conservation framework was developed and implemented for the Kruger National Park. CEO of the Wildlands Conservation Trust (now WILDTRUST) since 2004, with a long term focus on developing WILDTRUST into a dynamic and significant scale non-government organisation. Emphasis on the development, implementation and ongoing improvement of community based conservation and sustainability interventions, that will underwrite the WILDTRUST vision of a “Sustainable Future for All”.

Abstract

WILDTRUST is one of South Africa’s largest environmental NGO’s, and is recognised globally for its innovative and ground breaking community based conservation and sustainability interventions. The presentation will share insights into the development and impact of these interventions, with emphasis on contextualizing their evolution within the relevant socio, economic and environmental context. Emphasis on unpacking the opportunities and challenges of a social-entrepreneurship based approach to development and conservation.


Wiltrud Terlau

Bio

FOTO TERLAU DSCF0102Prof. Dr. Wiltrud Terlau (Economist, Agroecologist) holds the Professorship of Economics and Economic Policy at the Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences (BRSU) and is (Founding) Director at the International Centre for Sustainable Development (IZNE). Her fields of expertise comprise Socio-Ecological Transformation, Urban Projects (Blue-Green), Sustainable Production and Consumption, Biodiversity, Animal Welfare, Natural Resources, Disaster Risk Management and Bioeconomy. She was Vice President for International Affairs at BRSU and initiated cooperations with universities in Africa (Ghana and Kenya) and South America (Argentina, Uruguay) and is among others Member and Vice-Chairperson of the Biodiversity Network Bonn (BION e.V.), Germany. Furthermore, she initiated the study program ’CSR & NGO Management’ (MBA) jointly with colleagues. Moreover, she was Visiting Professor at the Coastal Carolina University, USA, and the Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina. She worked for the World Bank (Washington DC, USA), the OECD (Paris, France), the Federal Ministry for Economics (Bonn, Germany) and the RWI Leibniz Institute for Economic Research (Essen, Germany).

Abstract

Biodiversity conservation and local development – Business meets Practice

The phenomena of biodiversity loss is as old as the vast variety of plants, animals and humans is. Nevertheless, nowadays human activities became the major drivers of biodiversity loss and contributed to higher species extinction rates. And In particular, consumers in high-income countries utilize the biodiversity in low-income countries through the global exchange of goods and services. However, there are lot of opportunities and chances in actively facing these global threats through globally positioned and/or local green businesses and cooperation. Largely, green entrepreneurship, private businesses and SMEs contribute with their innovative ideas to the problem-solving process. Universities could support private initiatives with their expertise in, for instance, scientific work, application of global standards, their experience in founding and accompanying private initiatives and their technological skills. Education for Sustainable Development is the key. We will discuss some best practices in the collaboration between the science community and private businesses. The local level with its municipalities, communities and other social entities need to be considered. This is not only an ethical question, but it is essential for the sustainability of success of biodiversity conservation and for the sustainability of the projects. Furthermore these projects and business opportunities, usually take up ideas and input not only from science and market-based initiatives, but from civil society as well. Consequently, the ’Citizen Science’ approach is also part of the agenda.


Adrian Nel

Bio

adrianNelDr Nel is a human geographer, and was appointed as a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Geography at the University of Kwazulu-Natal in June of 2015. Prior to this he held a Visiting Scholar position with the Institute for Development Studies at the University of Sussex, and a research associate position with the Institute for Development Studies at the National University of Science and Technology (NUST) in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Dr Nel researches and teaches about contemporary human-environment relations and entanglements in Southern and Eastern Africa.


Stefan Hörmann

Bio

6761a SW kleinStefan Hörmann holds a diploma in Political and Administrative Science of the University of Constance in German, with a focus on environmental policy and development aid. He has been working for the German based non-profit Foundation Global Nature Fund (GNF) for 18 years. He leads the foundation’s office in Bonn and is head of the Business and Biodiversity Unit of GNF. In this function he has been the coordinator of the European Business and Biodiversity Campaign since 2010. Currently, he manages the EU LIFE Project “Biodiversity in Standards and Labels for the Food Sector. He is engaged in a number of Business and Biodiversity networks and expert groups.

Abstract

Business and Biodiversity: Opportunities for green and social entrepreneurship

Private sector is slowly increasing its efforts to integrate biodiversity considerations into business operations. A growing number of companies have committed themselves to reduce impacts on biodiversity or to even achieve a net positive impact. Likewise, consumer awareness for ethically and biodiversity friendly sourced materials is increasing according to the annual Biodiversity Barometer published by the Union for Ethical Biotrade (UEBT). These trends provide a set of opportunities for small entrepreneurships that want to establish a sustainable green business model. The presentation will highlight drivers for growing demands for biodiversity friendly services and products. Opportunities for businesses – in particular in Africa – to meet these demands will be addressed by analyzing the developments of markets for sustainably produced goods and non-consumptive uses of biodiversity. Challenges related to establishing a biodiversity friendly enterprise shall be discussed as well.

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Janavi Melissa Da Silva

Abstract

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Manfred Denich

Bio

indexManfred has a diploma in biology (applied botany, wood biology, zoology) and a doctoral degree in agricultural science (tropical agriculture, botany, rural sociology). Since 1998 he is a project leader and senior scientist at the Center for Development Research (ZEF), University of Bonn. Research experience in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Recent working fields are biomass-based value webs, bio-energy, climate change and adapted land use, agroforestry, small farmer land-use systems land degradation, conservation and use of biodiversity as well as inter and trans-disciplinary development research. Additionally, Manfred teaches at the University of Tokyo (Japan) and Wuhan (China) and serves in different bodies at national and international level.

Abstract

Conservation and use of the wild populations of Coffea arabica in the montane rainforests of Ethiopia

Coffea arabica originates from southwest Ethiopia, where its wild populations naturally occur in the understory of the montane rainforests at altitudes between 1,000 and 2,100 m. Wild Arabica coffee is not only consumed by local people, but it is also a cash crop for the local as well as the international specialty market. Above all, it is a unique gene pool for national and international coffee breeding, due to its high natural genetic diversity. Research had been carried out to assess the diversity and the economic value of the montane rainforests and the wild coffee gene pool, and to develop concepts for conservation and use of the wild coffee populations in its center of diversity. These concepts include (1) the conservation of the genetic diversity of the wild Arabica coffee populations, (2) the conservation of the species diversity of the montane rainforests, and (3) the sustainable use of wild coffee by the local population. These objectives require an interdisciplinary approach, integrating natural sciences, economics and social sciences. Accordingly, the research included vegetation studies, forest mapping, molecular genetic analyses, phytopathological and ecophysiological surveys, a valuation of the forest and the coffee gene pool as well as institutional analyses. The results of these activities are the basis for (1) the participatory development of conservation concepts (UNESCO-MAB Biosphere Reserve) for wild coffee and its forest habitat, (2) the development of management guidelines for the use of wild coffee and the coffee forests, (3) conservation education and public awareness raising (workshops, radio program, print media, newsletter, policy briefs, etc.), and (4) the development of business models for income generation for the local population as well as the financing of conservation activities.

Download the Teaser Presentation of the Agriculture Session here

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Charles Mackie Breen

Bio

CB PhotoCharles Breen studied at Rhodes University where he lectured for a number of years before moving to the then University of Natal (now University of KwaZulu-Natal). Later he became Director of the Institute of Natural Resources and was chairman of the Board of the Institute for Commercial Forestry Research for ten years. He is an environmental scientist with an enduring interest in social-ecological systems, particularly those that are structured around rivers and wetlands. He has collaborated with South African National Parks in the development and application of adaptive management, and served as a consultant for both the establishment and review of the World Bank funded Transfrontier Conservation Areas Project in Mozambique. Through his interests in aquatic social-ecological systems and protected area management, he has collaborated with colleagues at the University of Montana while providing opportunities for research students from Zambia, Namibia and elsewhere in southern Africa. His current interest is change and sustainability of social-ecological systems. Through participation in the International Water Security Network hosted locally by Monash South Africa, he has been supporting graduate students with interests in agricultural social-ecological systems. He is an Emeritus Professor and Fellow of the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

Abstract

Adapt or Transform and Adapt? Insights from Agricultural Water Use in Southern Africa

We survive by adapting to change. But, because we are all connected, our ability to adapt depends on how others adapt. This is particularly so in agricultural enterprises characterised by value chains operating over large organisational and spatial scales in which change can be fast, drought conditions for example, or slow as in climate change. Sometimes we can align with change by adapting incrementally. We avoid disruptions and the business stays pretty much the same. Under other conditions aligning with change requires radical transformation of the business and so transformational change is disruptive and requires dedicated management. Individual farmers are embedded in a web of connections and, to survive, they can use their connections to improve their ability to individually and collectively anticipate and adapt to water stress, input costs and market prices. Their awareness of the larger systems is reflected in the strength of their connectedness with other organizations that operate at larger scale. In this presentation I draw from research on four agricultural farming systems, each characterized by its dependence on a shared water resource. I illustrate the importance of scale (organizational, spatial and temporal) and collective adaptation, and consider a case where emergent conditions constrain adaptation to an extent that transformative change may be necessary for survival.

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Patricia Masikati

Bio

PatriciaDr. Patricia Masikati is an Agroforestry Systems Scientist at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) based in Zambia; she joined the organization in October 2014. She conceptualizes, designs and conducts research on the integration of trees within farming systems at field, farm and landscape scales. She also contributes to the development of tree-­‐crop-­‐livestock modelling and undertakes system analyses, systematic reviews and syntheses of the benefits, risks and trade-­‐offs of changing tree cover on farm land and other agricultural improvement options. Patricia is involved in several projects including ACIAR-­‐funded initiatives in East and Southern
Africa, which mainly focus on agroforestry and value chain innovation platforms for improved livelihoods, and DFID-­ and SIDA-­ funded projects on sustainable agriculture
intensification and integrated land management. These aim to promote participatory multi-­‐stakeholder approaches coupled withcomputer-­‐based tools to develop sustainable agricultural practices in smallholder farming systems. Prior to joining ICRAF, she worked with ICRISAT in Zimbabwe as a Post-­‐Doctoral Fellow (Crop-­ Livestock Systems Modeller) mainly focusing on development of agricultural management options aimed at promoting water-­‐efficient farm enterprises and risk management in semi-­arid areas. Patricia won her PhD in agriculture from the University of Bonn, Germany and her Masters, also in agriculture, from the University of Zimbabwe.

Abstract

Creation of sustainable food, nutrition and income portfolios in African smallholder agricultural systems Current smallholder agricultural systems in Southern Africa are characterized by farmers who get engaged in crop production mostly/solely during the rainy season totaling about five to six months annually. Farmers get one/two pay checks per year which are unfortunately not fat, resulting in low to non-reinvestment in agriculture, consequently poverty cycles. When we look at people working in cities for example in the different industries, production is all year round and workers get pay checks each month annually. This enables the majority to invest and eventually move out of poverty, such systems need to be adopted in our agricultural systems. Agriculture (mainly crop production) employs about 70% of the population, the majority are in rural areas and among the poorest. Although the current picture is not as rosy, there is potential both from the biophysical and socioeconomic side that it makes sense to expect poverty reduction, food and nutrition security and employment creation among others to come from the agricultural sector. However, there is need to develop some form of agricultural systems that provide food, nutrition and income portfolios across the year. This form of agriculture must be integrated and encompassing all other areas which are mostly neglected or partially addressed by many development agents. We propose agribusiness that include annual and perennial on-farm products (crops, livestock, fisheries, timber, fruit and fuel trees) and non- timber forest products. This would be coupled with identification of entrepreneurs who will be assisted in development of required innovations for different context specific value chains. The approach will ensure all year-round context specific income generating livelihoods, sensitive to gender and different social groups. Capacity building and research would be continual to ensure quality products and consistent volumes supplied to the market.

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Farirai Rusere

Abstract

Appropriate agricultural intensification is required in sub-Saharan African farming in response to the increasing demand for food. For this to be sustainable, there is a need to minimise environmental degradation, build resilience and adapt to climate change. In this regard sustainable and ecological intensification are the options currently being promoted in smallholder farming systems in Africa. Although numerous studies focusing on their potential in smallholder agriculture, limited research has been conducted on the interaction of intensification options to avoid environmental degradation, nor the same approach to adapt to climate change in smallholder agricultural systems in sub Saharan Africa. A study was undertaken investigate the potential ecological intensification options aiming to minimise environmental degradation, in addition adapting and mitigating the effects of climate change in rural areas of Limpopo and Eastern Cape of South Africa. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology was used to evaluate 17 ecological intensification options published in literature and common in South African smallholder agriculture. It was observed that the options had the potential to improve soil water conservation, soil fertility, pest suppression and adapting and mitigating the effects of climate change in smallholder farming systems on a sustainable basis. However, their potential was limited due to lack of awareness, germplasm and technical support related constraints. In this paper, it is argued that mechanisms should be introduced seeking to enhance awareness of the options, avail germplasm, farmer training, improved government extension and technical support to make the options more attractive to smallholder farmers. This will be a critical step towards successful implementation of ecological intensification in smallholder agriculture in sub Saharan Africa.

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Catherine Sutherland

Bio

Catherine-SutherlandCatherine Sutherland is a geographer who works at the interface between social and environmental systems with a focus on sustainable development. Catherine is interested in the relationship between society, space and environment and how this shapes environmental politics and policy making. She has worked on topics such as the impact of mega-projects on social environments in Durban, social assessment theory and methodology, sustainability indicators, risk and vulnerability, and urban/social policy. Her research interests are closely aligned with her teaching which focuses on social policy and environment and development.

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Ronja Volles

Abstract

The carbon storage service of forests and trees is widely accepted in science and policy and serves as a common policy strategy for countries to compensate their climate emissions and thus mitigate climate change. This thesis, however, aims at analysing the inclusion of opportunities for climate change adaptation in current science and policy debates. Scientific papers and the already developed National Adaptation Plans (NAPs)*1 are, therefore, qualitatively examined based on the context of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA). The research is guided by the questions I) What kind of opportunities for climate change adaptation do forest and tree services provide? and II) Are adaptation opportunities less prevalent in comparison to the mitigation effects of forests and trees in the political debate and is this divide visible when comparing a NAP with its’ respective Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC)*2? The semi-structured literature review reveals that forest and trees contribute to adaptation in various ways: a) by reducing social vulnerability (e.g. enhanced livelihood diversification), b) by reducing ecosystem vulnerability (e.g. plantation of climate adapted tree species), c) by reducing exposure (e.g. protection of coastal areas from climate-related threats) and d) by reducing the frequency or magnitude of climate related hazard (e.g. stabilisation of slopes, temperature regulation in cities). Considering these adaptation opportunities alongside the mitigation effects of forests and trees, offers various chances for policy integration that results in more effective outcomes for both adaptation and mitigation. Furthermore, it provides access to diverse funding streams. Awareness rising about these opportunities is thus not only important among politicians, but also within the civil society and the private sector, since business opportunities are offered.

*1 Adaptation strategies submitted by developing countries under the UNFCCC process.
*2 Mitigation strategies developed by all countries that ratified the Paris Agreement

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Jim Taylor

Bio

jimtaylorDr. Jim Taylor has spent over three decades as Director – Environmental Education at the Wildlife and Environment Society of South Africa (WESSA). Now an Honorary Life Member of WESSA Dr. Taylor has a deep interest in environmental education, Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and social change processes. He is the founder member of the Southern African Development Community’s Regional Environmental Education Programme (SADC-REEP). Dr Taylor is also a founder member of the Environmental Education Association of Southern Africa (EEASA) and is a past President. He has a PhD in environmental education from Rhodes University and a master’s degree in environmental psychology awarded by the University of Surrey in the U.K. He is currently a Research Fellow at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Abstract

Citizen science and Water: An emerging game-breaker?

The future well-being of human life on Earth is at risk. Fossil fuel and plastic pollution, ocean acidification, water and air pollution are all contributing to the risk. Although this is often termed an environment crisis it is actually a crisis of people – people who are abusing their environment (their only home) at an alarming rate. A people-centred crisis requires a people-centred response. Education for Sustainable Development is thus a global response to the crisis and is supported by the Global Action Partnership of UNESCO. In this presentation Jim Taylor will describe some of the innovations that are being used to reverse the risks we face. These include citizen science bio-monitoring for enhanced understanding and more sustainable water management. The presentation will touch on change-choice-practices, Transgressive Learning and Hand-prints for Change. Jim Taylor is a former Director of Environmental Education for WESSA. He continues his work as an honorary life-member of WESSA and is a UKZN Research Associate.

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Linda Downsborough

Bio

LD profile 2017Miss Linda Downsborough holds a Masters of Education degree, specialising in Environmental Education from Rhodes University and is currently pursuing her doctorate degree. She works as a lecturer and research in the Water Research node at Monash South Africa where she coordinates the Universities postgraduate water programmes and teaches into both the Master of Philosophy in Integrated water management and Postgraduate Diploma in water management. She is fascinated by learning and the ways in which people learn. As such social learning and communities of practice are of particular interest to her. She has been involved in several WRC projects ranging from the National Freshwater Ecosystems Priorities Area Projects, to work on estuaries, restoration ecology and most recently water use in Indigenous African vegetables. She also has a number of peer reviewed journal article’s spanning the fields of social learning, conservation, inter and transdisciplinary research, benefit sharing and water governance.

Abstract

Liquid gold: harvesting opportunities from water research

Everyone wants projects to have positive and impactful outcomes, that’s often why we do research but academic research doesn’t always lead to the practical and applied outcomes we want as individuals. Academic research at a masters level often only needs to make a contribution to knowledge, theory and literature and yet many of us still desire that out projects have meaning and impact. This talk draws on three case study examples from Masters students who undertook research at Monash South Africa. These case studies portray how students set out to investigate water management solutions, predominantly to floods in informal and formal settings and water quality issues, but ended up uncovering additional potential for social and economic development opportunities. Their projects uncovered the possibilities not only for improved water quality and flood management but for income generation opportunities and enhanced food security. Two of the students after completing their masters research have delved into unpacking these ideas further, one through further doctoral studies and one has developed patent for her floating wetlands technology which forms a central component to her current green infrastructure consultancy.

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Londiwe Zola Dlamini

Abstract

Accelerating urbanization in African cities is expected to contribute to some of the severest impacts experienced in the wake of climate change. In light of this, associated increased frequency and intensity of urban risks such as flooding, thereby threaten human life and built infrastructure; and increase vulnerability of communities already strained by socio-economic challenges. The objective of the study is to understand how societal actions impact the functionality of a river. The approach taken to investigate the aforementioned aim of the study is through applying the social-ecological systems framework for the Palmiet catchment, Durban, South Africa. The social-ecological systems framework is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding biophysical and social aspects in a landscape – both of which can no longer be studied in isolation in the context of the evolving understanding of the hydrological cycle. The Palmiet catchment offers a range of stakeholders who collaborate to better understand the dynamics of people and the Palmiet River within the catchment in a holistic manner. This group of stakeholders within the catchment has formed a community of innovators (CoI) that includes informal settlement dwellers, medium-income residents, government and non-government organizations. The CoI has contributed to equipping informal dwellers with skills and opportunities to generate income for themselves to empower themselves and improve their physical environment. The CoI was initially intended to address environmental and biophysical conditions within the catchment, however the social needs that exist cannot be ignored and therefore, it has been realized that in order to bring environmental change, inhabitants of the shared space are required to be involved in decision-making to bring about change in individual lives and overall change in the environmental conditions within the catchment.

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Liz Taylor

Bio

LizTaylorLiz was born and bred in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands. She has a BSc Honours (in Ecology) and a teaching diploma. A Geography teacher by profession, she has a deep love for the natural environment and people. She is both a member of the Board and Management team of the Duzi uMngeni Conservation Trust (DUCT) and has played a supportive role in launching and co-managing the DUCT Enviro-Champs a project that started in Mpophomeni Township in 2011. A civil society partnership, the Enviro-Champs monitor water and sanitation risks and work with various partners including local government and water authorities to address the issues faced in a township context. The Enviro-Champs concept has now been adapted and implemented in other parts of South Africa such as Ceres, Stellenbosch, Amanzimtoti, Knysna and Pongola. Once adapted the concept usually uses a different locally selected name.

Abstract

Community Based Water Management: Mpophomeni Enviro-Champs

In the context of declining water quality and a major drought, there are a variety of initiatives at many different levels that seek to respond to water, sanitation and waste related environmental issues in South Africa. One project in this regard is a relatively small initiative in the Mpophomeni township situated directly upstream of Midmar Dam in the uMngeni catchment. This initiative is best known for the work of a small group of dedicated environmental champions known as the Enviro-Champs. Initially established in 2011 as a joint initiative of the uMgungundlovu District Municipality (UMDM) and the Dusi uMngeni Conservation Trust (DUCT), a key activity within the project was to identify and support the development of the Enviro-Champs (previously unemployed people) with a view to enhancing the environment, particularly the water quality, within Mpophomeni and more particularly Midmar Dam which is the most important water reservoir in Kwa-Zulu Natal. Key to achieving these aims was addressing the persistent discharge of raw sewage into the local streams and into Midmar Dam from a dysfunctional local sewage system. The work of the Enviro-Champs has received substantial attention and their ability to work with a range of role players to address the spilling manholes within Mpophomeni has generated widespread interest from the water sector. These successes have been supported by a number of organisations with an interest in water quality including UMDM, Umgeni Water, The Department of Water and Sanitation, the Water Research Commission, DUCT, WESSA and WWF-South Africa. There has also been an increasing interest in scaling the work done by the Enviro-Champs particularly in terms of expanding the concept to other geographical areas that are faced by similar environmental issues.

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Musa Chamane

Bio

MusaMusa Chamane is groundWork´s Waste Campaign Manager. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Environmental Sciences and Honours degree in Policy and Development Studies from the University of KwaZulu Natal in Pietermaritzburg. He also has a diploma in Project Management from Varsity College in Pietermaritzburg. His previous place of work was at Built Environmental Support Group. Musa is interested mainly with working and mobilising communities around environmental justice issues, protecting the environment and working with government at all levels to affect change. For Musa, groundWork`s work is important because it aims at shifting people’s thinking when it comes to environmental issues. The environment`s well-being is very important for the health and sustainability of all living organisms, including humans. Often people´s attitudes towards the environment are fueled by lack of understanding, and groundWork looks to empower communities with the knowledge of the potential impacts that may arise from poor environmental management. For the past 15 year Musa has been working with communities on environmental issues particularly waste. Zero waste is the main focus of my campaign I have a strong belief that recycling in this country still needs to be taken seriously. From 2007, I have been organising waste pickers in South Africa and I have been instrumental in the formation of South African Waste Pickers Association
(SAWPA). Movement of waste pickers in South Africa especially those that works at the landfills/dumpsites around the country.

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Marwa AbdelHamid Ibrahim Hassan Shumo

Abstract

Apart from providing food products, livestock sector generates productive employment and valuable supplementary income to the vast majority of rural households, majority of whom are small and marginal farmers. Growing human population, increasing urbanization, rising domestic incomes and changing lifestyles have led to increasing demand for livestock products in the developing world. For sustainable rural livelihood, resource poor farmers have to overcome technical, economic and social constraints to take benefit of increasing demand of livestock products and compete with commercial producers. Strong demand for animal food products offers significant opportunities for livestock to contribute to economic growth and poverty reduction. But many smallholders are facing several challenges in remaining competitive with larger, more intensive production systems. Among these challenges are the high costs of feed that can reach up to 70% of the livestock production costs. In order to make use such opportunities, we have developed an alternative cost effective and sustainable black livestock feed production system based on the use of black soldier fly (BSF) in converting organic waste into feed. BSF efficiently convert various organic wastes into high-profile protein through decomposition, have global distribution, including moist tropic and subtropical regions, and can tolerate extreme temperatures. Their larvae can reduce a significant amount of various types of organic waste. Furthermore, they are not pests and actually deter the common houseflies that are normally linked to waste and low hygiene and health standards. BSF are not known to be vectors of any disease linked to animal or human health, unlike other insects such as the common housefly or mosquitoes. In addition, they produce less ammonia and GHG than traditional livestock, and occupy less space physically. BSF alternative feed systems will enhance both the livelihoods of humans as well as the quality of our environments.


Klaus Deimel

Bio

Klaus DeimelDr. rer. pol. Klaus Deimel studied Business Administration at the University of Münster, Germany. Subsequently he completed his doctorate studies in the field of Marketing at the Saarland University, Saarbrücken and the University of Essen, where he earned his PhD. After completing his doctorate studies Dr. Deimel worked for ten years with RAG Aktiengesellschaft, Essen, a multinational diversified mining company. He served in different positions and in the end as a general manager of an affiliate medium sized company for four years. In 1999 Dr. Deimel has been appointed as a professor for Managerial Accounting at Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences. In 2011 he has been elected both as Vice Dean and Dean of the Department of Management Sciences at BRS University. Since 2014 he is serving as managing director of the Center of Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Medium Sized Companies (CENTIM) at his university. His favorite fields of research are entrepreneurship, management accounting, value based management and strategic management issues in medium sized companies. He is advising start up enterprises of both for profit as well as non-for profit companies. In 2016 Dr. Deimel has been appointed as a member of the supervisory and investment board of Digital Hub Region Bonn AG, a regional venture capital incubator providing seed capital for young digital start up enterprises. He has published several books as well as articles in highly regarded scientific journals.

Abstract

Business Model Generation for Social Enterprises

Social and green entrepreneurship has become a more and more important topic in theory and practice. Since founders of social enterprises have little experience in setting up professional business plans, many of those social start up enterprises lack a viable business plan and reasonable business model which is essential for starting up a (social) venture. At this point the lean business model canvas provides a widely accepted toolkit that might support a comprehensive business model development. The Social Business Model Canvas is a tool for creating a solid business model around social enterprises. It’s also a collaborative tool that helps you communicate different business models with stakeholders and brainstorm new ones. Based on the definition of social investments the presentation describes the business model canvas concept and the application of the tool in practice as well as the development and application of a modified business model canvas for social enterprises. Against the background of the professional experience of the author as researcher, consultant as well as member of the supervisory body (investment board member) of a venture capital incubator the presentation will discuss some advices and recommendations for carving out convincing social venture business models (Do´s and Don´ts ).

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Lucky Litelu

Bio
Abstract


Bronwyn Dugtig

Bio

Bronwyn Dugtig_PhotoBronwyn Dugtig is the Head of Advancement and Community Engagement at Monash South Africa (MSA) and the National Director for YouthActionNet, where she runs the MSA LEAD (Leading Entrepreneurship for African Development) programme that supports young social entrepreneurs and connects them to a global network. Bronwyn is a member of MSA’s Centre for Transformative Research (CTR), a multidisciplinary research node focused on positively impacting society. Bronwyn has also twice won the Monash University Australia Social Inclusion Award for her significant contribution to promoting the university’s commitment to social justice and human rights. Bronwyn is passionate about social change and is committed to developing a generation of socially conscious young leaders. Before coming to MSA, she worked at the United Nations and was the Managing Director of Coolpolitics South Africa. Bronwyn is a board member of the South African Higher Education Community Engagement Forum (SAHECEF) and has consulted for the Department of Trade and Industry on business development networks. Bronwyn in a co-founder of Engage South Africa, which is a social enterprise committed to safeguarding and strengthening democracy and promotion of the SDG’s in South Africa and globally through the promotion of active citizenship and meaningful participation of youth in society. Bronwyn has a BA degree from the University of South Africa in Development and a Postgraduate Diploma in Management, specialising in Corporate Governance from MSA.

Abstract

Engage South Africa is a social business that believes in the power of youth to change societies for the better and is committed to safeguarding and strengthening democracy in South Africa through the promotion of active citizenship education and meaningful participation of youth in society. Engage SA is convinced that in order for young people to participate in meaningful ways in democracy, they first need to understand the functioning of a democracy, its advantages and challenges, what it means to be a citizen of a society, and what rights and responsibilities it entails. The current young generation has inherited its rights from the previous generation and often fails to see its responsibility in safeguarding those rights. Promoting the Sustainable Development Goals, Engage SA through my.voice helps young people to understand WHY it is important to participate, HOW they can participate and acquire the necessary knowledge, understanding and skills TO participate.

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Nqobizitha Dube

Abstract

Outside protected areas, the conservation of biodiversity in general and wildlife species in particular has been a challenge in Zimbabwe and southern Africa in general due to the pro-human development agenda. As such, wildlife populations continue to decline as human communities grow and populate ecosystems. Community based natural resource management (CBNRM) schemes based on markets and payment for ecosystem services attempt to remedy the challenge. In Zimbabwe, the Communal Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources (CAMPFIRE) is one such method that sought win-win sustainable solutions. Unfortunately, literature shows that CAMPFIRE has been fraught by shadow institutional markets and the exclusion of communities from benefits. Shadow institutional markets are rooted in elected officials (usually on 5-year terms) managing perpetual natural resources. The time mismatch results in authorities maximising gain in the limited time available in office at the expense of the community who live with and protect the wild life for overall community benefits. As an alternative, this endeavour seeks to assess the efficacy of the social entrepreneurial approach to CBNRM in Kezi district (Thuli conservation area), Zimbabwe. The approach proposes to match the time between biodiversity and local wildlife managers using the communities through their non-elected traditional leadership institutions. In this regard, the social entrepreneur (SE) becomes the conduit between communities and wildlife management. The SE subject to the community dictates aims at maximising community benefits from biodiversity conservation particularly wildlife; wildlife populations recovery and managed (through organised hunting and culling) and minimisation of human-wildlife conflict. Thus, the SE provides solutions for an environmental and social problems acting as a societal agent of change while exploring and promoting innovative development pathways. Moreover, this approach allows for win-win-win (community-SE-wildlife and biodiversity in general) innovations that create social and financial value through inclusive and green growth while conserving biodiversity.

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